The Importance of Psychosocial Care in Senior Living

A senior sitting up in bed looking out the window

There is an important link between psychosocial care and overall health in seniors. In the past, residents of long-term and post-acute care facilities were given attention based only on their medical needs. While medical needs are the first and foremost priority of care facilities, providers now understand the fundamental importance of meeting resident’s and patient’s social and emotional needs, on top of their medical needs. The facilities that truly “embrace the time, space, and action needed to recognize and investigate changes in residents’ emotional states” see the biggest improvements in their resident’s overall health.

Being in-tune with the resident’s emotional, social, and medical needs could be small changes, like adjusting the blinds in a patient’s room, to large changes to their care plan. These actions lead to an increase in resident satisfaction, fewer complaints, and, most importantly, a higher quality of life.

The best thing care providers can do to meet the resident’s emotional, social, and medical needs is to pay attention. Too often we find ourselves stuck in the monotony of life. Care providers should strive to pay attention, listen intently, and remember that each resident has an individual and very different psychosocial needs.

Psychosocial needs are an array of social and emotional needs. Psychosocial needs have a strong correlation to mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, dementia, and delirium. All residents in a care facility are in a new environment, they experience loss of relationships, loss of personal control and identity, adjustment to the facility, and continuity of care. These adjustments can be very difficult on residents, and when their psychosocial needs are met, they can be given the opportunity to thrive.

Medical, emotional, and social needs in a care facility are intertwined. As a patient receives a new diagnosis, this affects their emotional state and can have implications on their social needs and social ability. As care providers are aware of each change and implication, they can help residents and patients navigate changes, and day to day life, as successfully as possible.

Providing excellent, attuned psychosocial care is not something that can be done by one person alone. Excellent psychosocial care is a culture that must be fostered by care providers. Every member of the staff must work towards the goal of meeting each resident and patient’s psychosocial needs. Social workers are an important aspect of facility care, but they cannot be wholly responsible for psychosocial care.

Residents can grow and flourish in a facility where they feel emotionally safe and secure. Important factors in creating a culture that promotes psychosocial care are: how people are addressed, how much time staff spends with residents, communication with families, how complaints are addressed, and being conscientious and careful with room assignments.

In conclusion, successful post-acute and long term care facilities strive to meet each resident’s psychosocial needs. When residents’ psychosocial needs are met, they are more fulfilled, more secure, and more likely to have a higher quality of life. Care providers must strive to focus on each resident’s emotional, medical, and social needs.

http://www.providermagazine.com/archives/2019_Archives/Pages/0419/The-Emotional-Side-of-Care.aspx

Benefits of Onsite Dialysis at Skilled Nursing Facilities

dialysis patient receiving treatment

Approximately fourteen percent of Americans suffer from some degree of kidney disease. The highest populous of people in this group are those of the elderly community. Those who suffer from Chronic Kidney Disease, and reach stage 5 (end-stage renal disease), require dialysis or a transplant. Because surgery and other risks are higher when people are above a certain age, most elderly people who suffer from end-stage renal disease must get dialysis.

When living in a skilled nursing facility, and participating in dialysis, residents must schedule their precious time, find transportation, and spend long hours receiving treatment, and then schedule transportation home. This is why many skilled nursing facilities are beginning to offer dialysis on-site.

Dialysis is the process of using a machine to filter out water from the kidneys. When kidneys lose function, they are unable to filter the water themselves. There are two types of dialysis for those with kidney failure. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis is the type that skilled nursing facilities are offering.

When skilled nursing facilities offer dialysis, the residents get the benefit of staying on-site, eliminating the commute time, waiting room time, and inconvenience. Residents also get the benefit of staying in a familiar, quiet, comfortable place, which is an important amenity for elderly residents, especially those who are recovering from surgery, injury, or suffer from memory loss.

In-house dialysis is often complex, so many skilled nursing facilities are opting to partner with dialysis centers and have a registered nurse travel to the facility a few times a week to complete the dialysis for the residents.

When skilled nursing facilities operate their own dialysis care without partners, there are many rules and regulations they must follow. The skilled nursing facility must “ensure that an ESRD facility, maintains direct responsibility for the dialysis-related care and services provided to the nursing home resident consistent with the ESRD Conditions for Coverage requirements as well as the terms of an applicable agreement with the nursing home.” Requirements, education, and training are closely monitored and regulated.

The three most important regulations for dialysis at skilled nursing facilities are: onsite supervision of dialysis must be provided by a registered nurse; qualified, trained personnel must be present for the entire dialysis treatment, with the ability to see the patient; and if the skilled nursing facility is, for whatever reason, unable to provide scheduled dialysis for a resident, the nursing facility must notify a dialysis center and get the resident dialysis off-site in order to avoid delays or cancellation in treatment.

Offering in-house dialysis for residents improves the quality of their life. As the quality of life improves, residents increase their fulfillment and functional ability. Skilled nursing facilities strive to provide the highest quality of care, and offering in-house dialysis is another step towards improving the lives of residents.

Reference:

https://www.healio.com/nephrology/policy-and-politics/news/online/%7Bc9d6a7c9-8e9c-43b1-b04d-7eafef762f88%7D/cms-releases-new-rules-on-dialysis-care-in-nursing-homes?page=2